Recipe Review: Peanut Power Pasta

My Peanut Power noodles wrapped around a fork.

Ok, so the actual name of this recipe from Taste of Home Magazine is “Saucy Thai Beef Noodles” but that’s BORRRRRING so I am calling it PEANUT POWER PASTA! I love Thai food, and who doesn’t love peanut sauce? I’d bathe in that stuff, if I could. Ok, maybe that’s a slight exaggeration because I would forever smell like Skippy, but who doesn’t love a good hyperole? But Peanut Sauce IS delicious, and when the creamy, tangy taste hits my taste buds, I feel bad for peanut allergy sufferers who have to live with the bland and incomparable substitution of Almond butter. (PS Have you ever tried Peter Pan Peanut Butter? I tried some a month ago because I had heard a bunch of hipsters raving about it- that shiz is nasty! Don’t do it! It’s like… peanut lard.)

I followed this recipe to a T (which is unusual for me because I’m more about “a splash of this, a dash of that, I’ll just throw this in there and see what happens” type of cooking), and if I had to rate it, I’d give it 3 out of 5 stars. The taste was right on – actually, the peanut sauce on its own was fabulous! The biggest problem was 1) Not enough veggies, and 2) spaghetti noodles are the wrong type of starch for these Asian flavors, which are already strong on their own and get overpowered by the the thick noodle and heavy peanut sauce. So it was basically a texture problem – not a deal breaker, but next time I will use some vermicelli or even just brown rice with the sauce and vegetables. Oh. I lied. I didn’t follow the recipe to a tee – I used Sugar Snap Peas instead of Snow Peas because Sugar Snaps were .50c cheaper than snow peas, and I’m cheap.

It’s interesting because the reviews on this recipe actually state the same thing – too much peanut sauce, not the right starch, and rate it about 3 out of 5. If you make it, try doubling up on the veggies, cutting down on the PB, and using a different starch – and tell me what you think!

Can you tell I love cilantro?

  • 1/2 cup 2% milk
  • 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons sherry
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 3 drops hot pepper sauce
  • 12 ounces uncooked spaghetti
  • 1 beef top sirloin steak (1 pound), thinly sliced
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons canola oil, divided
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced fresh carrot
  • 1/2 cup julienned sweet red pepper
  • 1 cup fresh snow peas
  • 2 green onions, sliced
  • 1/4 cup chopped salted peanuts
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro

Directions

  • In a small saucepan, bring the first eight ingredients just to a boil, stirring constantly. Remove from the heat; set aside.
  • Cook spaghetti according to package directions.
  • In a large skillet or wok, stir-fry beef in 1/2 teaspoon oil until no longer pink. Remove and keep warm.
  • Stir-fry carrot and red pepper in remaining oil for 3-4 minutes. Add snow peas and onions; stir-fry 2-3 minutes longer or until vegetables are crisp-tender. Return beef to skillet.
  • Drain noodles; add to the pan. Add peanut sauce and toss to coat. Sprinkle with peanuts and cilantro. Yield: 6 servings.

Nutrition Facts: 1-1/3 cups equals 536 calories, 19 g fat (4 g saturated fat), 31 mg cholesterol, 795 mg sodium, 58 g carbohydrate, 5 g fiber, 34 g protein.

**A serving of this is incredibly dense. I ended up eating about 1 cup.

(How many WW points is this? Do I want to know? Guess I’ll know tomorrow after my first meeting.)


3 thoughts on “Recipe Review: Peanut Power Pasta

  1. I <3 me some peanut sauce. And I would bathe in it. Every day. Word.

    :o)

    Great post- I am always weary of trying to make my own peanut sauce cause it never seems to come out right, but I'll give this one a go- thanks!

  2. I’m a BIG fan of soba noodles. They’re delicious and more “whole grain” they white pasta. Also, i like farro pasta a lot, too. Probably harder to find, though.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>