Buy the box weight loss

Even though I am currently “doing” Weight Watchers, it took me a while to get keen on  the idea of paying money to do a program that had already been determined for me before nothing was known of my own personal condition. But since I can’t resist a good deal and I knew I needed some sort of extra pressure to help me… I signed up.  As you guys saw with my last update, I have actually been having some success over the past few months.  Whether or not I could have done that on my own, who knows.  I do know that I counted points for like 2 weeks and the rest of the time I have just been eating my typical “earth food” that comes from the ground rather than a box.

I’ve got this issue with boxes with more than just avoiding food from them.  I also have a big issue with companies that try to fit their potential customers or current customers into a box.  Specially, weight loss plans.  Ever since I started gaining weight as a teenager, I’ve had suggestions of weight loss programs that I should do.  Slimfast.  Nutrisystem. Jenny Craig.  Weight Watchers.  Atkins.  Now, as an adult blogger, the suggestions come on even stronger.

The past few months on Weight Watchers has really confirmed my disliking of programs that are designed to place certain people in certain boxes.  For example, my daily point allowance for WW was based on my age, height, weight, and my suggested activity level.  The spectrum for everything is pretty broad though.  According to this handy blog by LaaLoosh, age groups are clumped within ten years and people who fall between 5’1 and 5’10 are clumped together as well.  So that means a 27 year old female who is 5’9″ and 200 pounds who is sedentary will have similar point values to a 37 year old female who is 5’2″ and 160 pounds and walks often.  I would like to believe it is balanced accordingly per person, but I just doubt the specific attention each member receives when determining what they should eat every day.

Weight Watchers gripes aside, my point is this:  I believe there is no program that works for everyone.  The weight loss industry in the United States is driven by one thing: money.  Our country feeds into this multi-billion dollar industry by quickly latching on to whatever they feel is going to be the easiest solution to their weight loss.  I know when I signed up for Weight Watchers, it was and is because I still feel like I need the weekly meetings in order to feel accountable for myself.  I had a feeling that I probably wouldn’t actually track points and  even without it, I have still been able to have success.  Whether or not it is because I’m enrolled in the program and going to the meetings, who knows.  I do feel more determined that ever to get this weight off so whatever it is that I’m doing, it is working.

However, I can not just go and say that Weight Watchers works for everyone.  I think the only sort of program I can really advocate for is one that a trained dietitian and nutritionist creates specifically for YOU.  Anyone that I have talked to about their successful weight loss has been on a journey that has consisted of what they have crafted together by what works best for their bodies.  There is no simple, by the box, weight loss program that works for everyone. The trick is just finding what works for YOU.

Lots of love,

AprilSignatur

 

 

 


7 thoughts on “Buy the box weight loss

  1. Hey,
    I had this problem and tried so many things. Different things work for different people and I was lucky enough to find one that worked for me. I lost 18 pounds in one month without much exercise and it’s been a life changer. I’m a little embarrased to post my before and after photos here but if anyone actually cares to hear what I’ve been doing then I’d be happy to help in any way. Just shoot me an email at wberk758[at]gmail.com and I’ll show you my before and after photos, and tell you about how things are going for me with the stuff I’ve tried. I wish someone would have helped me out when I was struggling to find a solution so if I can help you then it would make my day.

  2. You’re right, there is no one way to achieve fitness goals. For those who have read this blog long enough we’ve seen both you and Alyssa try out different methods to lose weight. What works for Alyssa may not work for you, and vice versa. Each of our bodies are unique, our lifestyles and habits different.

  3. great post. everyone finds a different plan that works for them. but its interesting reading about how people in different situations can have same amount of points but yet be so different. i suppose that’s the one good thing about a more calorie based plan.

  4. WW, Jenny, NutriSystem, MediFast, and every other Pay Up Plan are all for-profit corporations who depend on repeat membership to increase their margin and boost share prices. From where I sit, I can point to the homes of a half dozen women who have “done” WW a half dozen times each in the several years I’ve known them. Pig out every October-December with the promise of joining WW and starting Jan. 1. Strict adherence to “points” and crap for about two months. They never eliminate their trigger foods because WW says you don’t have to. They eliminate full meals for an entire day so they can eat pizza and ice cream and drink wine in copious amounts at a party. By March or so, they’re sneaking back to bigger portions, “forgetting” to count points, taking bites here and there, and by May, they’ve gained back the (big deal) 10 pounds they lost in Jan-Feb. They start up again to try to lose weight for summer, but what with all those cookouts and vacation, they can’t really be expected to stick to that! And then the fall comes and they put on another 15 or so pounds and then they re-join in January. The failure rate for meal delivery plans like the others above is even worse. Your body will lose weight through any form of starvation. It will NEVER keep it off permanently. A diet of whole, clean foods with minimal processing and ZERO added sugar, heavy on veggies, medium in lean protein, light on fruit, dairy and legumes…consumed in appropriate ratios and portions…and vigorous regular exercise (not a stroll through the mall with a latte in hand) is what leads to real weight loss and sustainable maintenance. VERY FEW DEVIATIONS. Dessert not more than six times a year: your birthday. Your spouse’s birthday. Whatever three major holidays you celebrate. Alcohol? The less the better. Sleep? The more the better. TV, Facebook, etc? The enemy of exercise (“I don’t have time to exercise, but I spend 4 hours on the laptop every night”) — ditch the “plans” and use common sense. You know which foods heal and which foods aren’t even really food. Dare to be different.

    • Why I totally understand your point about a lot of the weight loss systems being a way to make money and what not, I do have to disagree with you about things you’ve mentioned about Weight Watchers.

      Yes, they tell you that you don’t have to give anything up. But they do try to help you to find other alternatives to trigger foods. That’s why there are meetings, to help people solve other issues. They do have guidelines to follow in regards to getting in fruits, veggies, and other healthy foods. And they have the Simply Filling Technique, which is completely based on whole foods.

      As for the people you know that have tried WW several times, the fault is their own. Not the program itself. It’s just like any lifestyle change, it is up to the individual to be successful. Weight Watchers is a tool to help you do that. Just like the lifestyle/diet you mentioned, it’ll work if the person wants it to.

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